Planet ALUG

August 24, 2015

Jonathan McDowell

Random post-DebConf 15 thoughts

There are a bunch of things I mean to blog about, but as I have just got fully home from Heidelberg and DebConf15 this afternoon that seems most appropriate to start with. It’s a bit of a set of disjoint thoughts, but I figure I should write them down while they’re in my head.

DebConf is an interesting conference. It’s the best opportunity the Debian project has every year to come together and actually spend a decent amount of time with each other. As a result it’s a fairly full on experience, with lots of planned talks as a basis and a wide range of technical discussions and general social interaction filling in whatever gaps are available. I always find it a thoroughly enjoyable experience, but equally I’m glad to be home and doing delightfully dull things like washing my clothes and buying fresh milk.

I have always been of the opinion that the key aspect of DebConf is the face time. It was thus great to see so many people there - we were told several times that this was the largest DebConf so far (~ 570 people IIRC). That’s good in the sense that it meant I got to speak to a lot of people (both old friends and new), but does mean that there are various people I know I didn’t spend enough, or in some cases any, time with. My apologies, but I think many of us were in the same situation. I don’t feel it made the conference any less productive for me - I managed to get a bunch of hacking done, discuss a number of open questions in person with various people and get pulled into various interesting discussions I hadn’t expected. In short, a typical DebConf.

Also I’d like to say that the venue worked out really well. I’ll admit I was dubious when I heard it was in a hostel, but it was well located (about a 30 minute walk into town, and a reasonable bus service available from just outside the door), self-contained with decent facilities (I’m a big believer in having DebConf talks + accommodation be as close as possible to each other) and the room was much better than expected (well, aside from the snoring but I can’t blame the DebConf organisers for that).

One of the surprising and interesting things for me that was different from previous DebConfs was the opportunity to have more conversations with a legal leaning. I expect to go to DebConf and do OpenPGP/general crypto related bits. I wasn’t expecting affirmation about the things I have learnt on my course over the past year, in terms of feeling that I could use that knowledge in the process of helping Debian. It provided me with some hope that I’ll be able to tie my technology and law skills together in a way that I will find suitably entertaining (as did various conversations where people expressed significant interest in the crossover).

Next year is in Cape Town, South Africa. It’s a long way (though I suppose no worse than Portland and I get to stay in the same time zone), and a quick look at flights indicates they’re quite expensive at the moment. The bid presentation did look pretty good though so as soon as the dates are confirmed (I believe this will happen as soon as there are signed contracts in place) I’ll take another look at flights.

In short, excellent DebConf, thanks to the organisers, lovely to see everyone I managed to speak to, apologies to those of you I didn’t manage to speak to. Hopefully see you in Cape Town next year.

August 24, 2015 03:18 PM

August 20, 2015

Mick Morgan

update to domain privacy

At the end of last month I noted that I had been receiving multiple emails to each of the proxy addresses listed for my newly registered “private” domains. Intriguingly, whilst I was receiving at least three or four such emails a week before I wrote about it, I have had precisely zero since.

Probably coincidence, but a conspiracy theorist would have field day with that.

by Mick at August 20, 2015 06:55 PM

August 19, 2015

Mick Morgan

why privacy matters

Last month my wife and I shared a holiday with a couple of old friends. We have known this couple since before we got married, indeed, they attended our wedding. We consider them close friends and enjoy their company. One evening in a pub in Yorkshire, we got to discussing privacy, the Snowden revelations, and the implications of a global surveillance mechanism such as is used by both the UK and its Five Eyes partners (the US NSA in particular). To my complete surprise, Al expressed the view that he was fairly relaxed about the possibility that GCHQ should be capable of almost complete surveillance of his on-line activity since, in his view, “nothing I do can be of any interest to them, so why should I worry.”

I have met this view before, but oddly I had never heard Al express himself in quite this way in all the time I have known him. It bothers me that someone I love and trust, someone whose opinions I value, someone I consider to be intelligent and articulate and caring, should be so relaxed about so pernicious an activity as dragnet surveillance. It is not only the fact that Al himself is so relaxed that bothers me so much as the fact that if he does not care, then many, possibly most, people like him will not care either. That attitude plays into the hands of those, like Eric Schmidt, who purport to believe that “If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.”

Back in October last year, Glenn Greenwald gave a TED talk on the topic, “Why privacy matters”. I recommended it to Al and I commend it to anyone who thinks, as he does, that dragnet surveillance doesn’t impact on them because they “are not doing anything wrong”.

by Mick at August 19, 2015 05:53 PM

August 11, 2015

Jonathan McDowell

Programming the FST-01 (gnuk) with a Bus Pirate + OpenOCD

Last year at DebConf14 Lucas authorized the purchase of a handful of gnuk devices, one of which I obtained. At the time it only supported 2048 bit RSA keys. I took a look at what might be involved in adding 4096 bit support during DebConf and managed to brick my device several times in doing so. Thankfully gniibe was on hand with his STLinkV2 to help me recover. However subsequently I was loathe to experiment further at home until I had a suitable programmer.

As it is this year has been busy and the 1.1.x release train is supposed to have 4K RSA (as well as ECC) support. DebConf15 is coming up and I felt I should finally sort out playing with the device properly. I still didn’t have a suitable programmer. Or did I? Could my trusty Bus Pirate help?

The FST-01 has an STM32F103TB on it. There is an exposed SWD port. I found a few projects that claimed to do SWD with a Bus Pirate - Will Donnelly has a much cloned Python project, the MC HCK project have a programmer in Ruby and there’s LibSWD though that’s targeted to smarter programmers. None of them worked for me; I could get the Python bits as far as correctly doing the ID of the device, but not reading the option bytes or successfully flashing (though I did manage an erase).

Enter the old favourite, OpenOCD. This already has SWD support and there’s an outstanding commit request to add Bus Pirate support. NodoNogard has a post on using the ST-Link/V2 with OpenOCD and the FST-01 which provided some useful pointers. I grabbed the patch from Gerrit, applied it to OpenOCD git and built an openocd.cfg that contained:

source [find interface/buspirate.cfg]

buspirate_port /dev/ttyUSB0
buspirate_vreg 1
buspirate_mode normal
transport select swd

source [find target/stm32f1x.cfg]

My BP has the Seeed Studio probe cable, so my hookups look like this:

Bus Pirate + FST-01 SWD connection

That’s BP MOSI (grey) to SWD IO, BP CLK (purple) to SWD CLK, BP 3.3V (red) to FST-01 PWR and BP GND (brown) to FST-01 GND. Once that was done I fired up OpenOCD in one terminal and did the following in another:

$ telnet localhost 4444
Trying ::1...
Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.
Open On-Chip Debugger
> reset halt
target state: halted
target halted due to debug-request, current mode: Thread
xPSR: 0x01000000 pc: 0xfffffffe msp: 0xfffffffc
Info : device id = 0x20036410
Info : SWD IDCODE 0x1ba01477
Error: Failed to read memory at 0x1ffff7e2
Warn : STM32 flash size failed, probe inaccurate - assuming 128k flash
Info : flash size = 128kbytes
> stm32f1x unlock 0
Device Security Bit Set
stm32x unlocked.
INFO: a reset or power cycle is required for the new settings to take effect.
> reset halt
target state: halted
target halted due to debug-request, current mode: Thread
xPSR: 0x01000000 pc: 0xfffffffe msp: 0xfffffffc
> flash write_image erase /home/noodles/checkouts/gnuk/src/build/gnuk.elf
auto erase enabled
wrote 109568 bytes from file /home/noodles/checkouts/gnuk/src/build/gnuk.elf in 95.055603s (1.126 KiB/s)
> stm32f1x lock 0
stm32x locked
> reset halt
target state: halted
target halted due to debug-request, current mode: Thread 
xPSR: 0x01000000 pc: 0x08000280 msp: 0x20005000

Then it was a matter of disconnecting the gnuk from the BP, plugging it into my USB port and seeing it come up successfully:

usb 1-2: new full-speed USB device number 11 using xhci_hcd
usb 1-2: New USB device found, idVendor=234b, idProduct=0000
usb 1-2: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=3
usb 1-2: Product: Gnuk Token
usb 1-2: Manufacturer: Free Software Initiative of Japan
usb 1-2: SerialNumber: FSIJ-1.1.7-87063020
usb 1-2: ep 0x82 - rounding interval to 1024 microframes, ep desc says 2040 microframes

More once I actually have a 4K key loaded on it.

August 11, 2015 02:29 PM

July 10, 2015

Chris Lamb

Where's the principled opposition to the "WhatsApp ban"?

The Independent reports that David Cameron wishes to ban the instant messaging application WhatsApp due its use of end-to-end encryption.

That we might merely be pawns in manoeuvring for some future political compromise (or merely susceptible to cheap clickbait) should be cause for some concern, but what should worry us more is that if it takes scare stories about WhatsApp for our culture to awaken on the issues of privacy and civil liberties, then the central argument against surveillance was lost a long time ago.

However, the situation worsens once you analyse the disapproval in more detail. One is immediately struck by a predominant narrative of technical considerations; a ban would be "unworkable" or "impractical". A robust defence of personal liberty or a warning about the insidious nature of chilling effects? Perhaps a prescient John Locke quote to underscore the case? No. An encryption ban would "cause security problems."

The argument proceeds in a tediously predictable fashion: it was already difficult to keep track whether one should ipso facto be in favour of measures that benefit the economy, but we are suddenly co-opted as technocrats to consider the "damage" it could to do the recovery or the impact on a now-victimised financial sector. The «coup-de-grâce» finally appeals to our already inflated self-regard and narcissism: someone could "steal your identity."

Perhaps even more disappointing is the reaction from more technically-minded circles who, frankly, should know better. Here, they give the outward impression of metaphorically stockpiling copies of the GnuPG source code in their bunkers, perhaps believing the shallow techno-utopianist worldview that all social and cultural problems can probably be solved with Twitter and a JavaScript intepreter.

The tragedy here is that I suspect that this isn't what the vast majority of people really believe. Given a hypothetical ban that could, somehow, bypass all of the stated concerns, I'm pretty upbeat and confident that most people would remain uncomfortable with it on some level.

So what, exactly, does it take for us to oppose this kind of intervention on enduring principled grounds instead of transient and circumventable practical ones? Is the problem just a lack of vocabulary to discuss these issues on a social scale? A lack of courage?

Whilst it's certainly easier to dissect illiberal measures on technical merit than to make an impassioned case for abstract freedoms, every time we gleefully cackle "it won't work" we are, in essence, conceding the central argument to the authoritarian and the censorious. If one is right but for the wrong reasons, were we even right to begin with?

July 10, 2015 06:23 PM

July 01, 2015

Daniel Silverstone (Kinnison)

Be careful what you ask for

Date: Wed, 01 Jul 2015 06:13:16 -0000
From: 123-reg <noreply@123-reg.co.uk>
To: dsilvers@digital-scurf.org
Subject: Tell us what you think for your chance to win
X-Mailer: MIME::Lite 3.027 (F2.74; T1.28; A2.04; B3.13; Q3.13)

Tell us what you think of 123-reg!

<!--

.style1 {color: #1996d8}

-->

Well 123-reg mostly I think you don't know how to do email.

by Daniel Silverstone at July 01, 2015 01:28 PM

June 22, 2015

Steve Engledow (stilvoid)

Pretty please

I've been making a thing to solve some problems I always face while building web APIs. Curl is lovely but it's a bit too flexible.

Also, web services generally spit out one of a fairly common set of formats: (json, xml, html) and I often just want to grab a value from the response and use it in a script - maybe to make the next call in a workflow.

So I made please which makes it super simple to do things like making a web request and grabbing a particular value from the response.

For example, here's how you'd get the page title from this site:

please get http://offend.me.uk/ | please parse html.head.title.#text

Or getting a value out of the json returned by jsontest.com's IP address API:

please get http://ip.jsontest.com/ | please parse ip

The parse part of please is the most fun; it can convert between a few different formats. Something I do quite often is grabbing a json response from an API and spitting it out as yaml so I can read it easily. For example:

please get http://date.jsontest.com/ | please parse -o yaml

(alright so that's a poor example but the difference is huge when it's a complicated bit of json)

Also handy for turning an unreadable mess of xml into yaml (I love yaml for its readability):

echo '<docroot type="messydoc"><a><b dir="up">A tree</b><b dir="down">The ground</b></a></docroot>' | please parse -o yaml

As an example, of the kinds of things you can play with, I made this tool for generating graphs from json.

I'm still working on please; there will be bugs; let me know about them.

by Steve Engledow (steve@offend.me.uk) at June 22, 2015 02:06 PM

June 11, 2015

Daniel Silverstone (Kinnison)

In defence of curl | sudo bash -

Long ago, in days of yore, we assumed that any software worth having would be packaged by the operating system we used. Debian with its enormous pile of software (over 20,000 sources last time I looked) looked to basically contain every piece of free software ever. However as more and more people have come to Linux-based and BSD-based systems, and the proliferation of *NIX-based systems has become even more diverse, it has become harder and harder to ensure that everyone has access to all of the software they might choose to use.

Couple that with the rapid development of new projects, who clearly want to get users involved well before the next release cycle of a Linux-based distribution such as Debian, and you end up with this recommendation to bypass the operating system's packaging system and simply curl | sudo bash -.

We, the OS-development literati, have come out in droves to say "eww, nasty, don't do that please" and yet we have brought this upon ourselves. Our tendency to invent, and reinvent, at the very basic levels of distributions has resulted in so many operating systems and so many ways to package software (if not in underlying package format then in policy and process) that third party application authors simply cannot keep up. Couple that with the desire of the consumers to not have their chosen platform discounted, and if you provide Debian packages, you end up needing to provide for Fedora, RHEL, SuSE, SLES, CentOS, Mint, Gentoo, Arch, etc.etc; let alone supporting all the various BSDs. This leads to the simple expedience of curl | sudo bash -.

Nobody, not even those who are most vehemently against this mechanism of installing software, can claim that it is not quick, simple for users, easy to copy/paste out of a web-page, and leaves all the icky complexity of sorting things out up to a script which the computer can run, rather than the nascent user of the software in question. As a result, many varieties of software have ended up using this as a simple installation mechanism, from games to orchestration frameworks - everyone can acknowledge how easy it is to use.

Now, some providers are wising up a little and ensuring that the url you are curling is at least an https:// one. Some even omit the sudo from the copy/paste space and have it in the script, allowing them to display some basic information and prompting the user that this will occur as root before going ahead and elevating. All of these myriad little tweaks to the fundamental idea improve matters but are ultimately just putting lipstick on a fairly sad looking pig.

So, what can be done? Well we (again the OS-development literati) got ourselves into this horrendous mess, so it's up to us to get ourselves back out. We're all too entrenched in our chosen packaging methodologies, processes, and policies, to back out of those; yet we're clearly not properly servicing a non-trivial segment of our userbase. We need to do better. Not everyone who currently honours a curl | sudo bash - is capable of understanding why it's such a bad idea to do so. Some education may reduce that number but it will never eliminate it.

For a long time I advocated a switch to wget && review && sudo ./script approach instead, but the above comment, about people who don't understand why it might be a bad idea, really applies to show how few of those users would even be capable of starting to review a script they downloaded, let alone able to usefully judge for themselves if it is really safe to run. Instead we need something better, something collaborative, something capable of solving the accessibility issues which led to the curl | sudo bash - revolt in the first place.


I don't pretend to know what that solution might be, and I don't pretend to think I might be the one to come up with it, but I can hilight a few things I think we'll need to solve to get there:

  1. Any solution to this problem must be as easy as curl | sudo bash - or easier. This might mean a particular URI format which can have os-specific ways to handle standardised inputs, or it might mean a pervasive tool which does something like that.
  2. Any solution must do its best to securely acquire the content the user actually wanted. This means things like validating SSL certificates, presenting information to the user which a layman stands a chance of evaluating to decide if the content is likely to be what they wanted, and then acting smoothly and cleanly to get that content onto the user's system.
  3. Any solution should not introduce complex file formats or reliance on any particular implementation of a tool. Ideally it would be as easy to implement the solution on FreeBSD in shell, or on Ubuntu as whizzy 3D GUIs written in Haskell. (modulo the pain of working in shell of course)
  4. The solution must be arrived at in a multi-partisan way. For such a mechanism to be as usefully pervasive as curl | sudo bash - as many platforms as possible need to get involved. This means not only Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora and SuSE; but also Arch, FreeBSD, NetBSD, CentOS etc. Maybe even the OpenSolaris/Illumos people need to get involved.

Given the above, no solution can be "just get all the apps developers to learn how to package software for all the OS distributions they want their app to run on" since that way madness lies.

I'm sure there are other minor, and major, requirements on any useful solution but the simple fact of the matter is that until and unless we have something which at least meets the above, we will never be rid of curl | sudo bash - :- just like we can never seem to be rid of that one odd person at the party, noone knows who invited them, and noone wants to tell them to leave because they do fill a needed role, but noone really seems to like.

Until then, let's suck it up and while we might not like it, let's just let people keep on curl | sudo bash -ing until someone gets hurt.


P.S. I hate curl | sudo bash - for the record.

by Daniel Silverstone at June 11, 2015 12:32 PM

MJ Ray

Mick Morgan: here’s why pay twice?

http://baldric.net/2015/06/05/why-pay-twice/ asks why the government hires civilians to monitor social media instead of just giving GC HQ the keywords. Us cripples aren’t allowed to comment there (physical ability test) so I reply here:

It’s pretty obvious that they have probably done both, isn’t it?

This way, they’re verifying each other. Politicians probably trust neither civilians or spies completely and that makes it worth paying twice for this.

Unlike lots of things that they seem to want not to pay for at all…

by mjr at June 11, 2015 03:49 AM

May 14, 2015

Steve Engledow (stilvoid)

Andy and Teddy are waving goodbye

Most of the time, when I've got some software I want to write, I do it in python or sometimes bash. Occasionally though, I like to slip into something with a few more brackets. I've written a bit of C in the past and love it but recently I've been learning Go and what's really struck me is how clever it is. I'm not just talking about the technical merits of the language itself; it's clever in several areas:

In summary, I'm starting to wonder if Google have a time machine. Go seems to have nicely predicted several worries and trends since its announcement: Docker, Heartbleed, and social coding.

by Steve Engledow (steve@offend.me.uk) at May 14, 2015 11:28 PM

MJ Ray

Recorrecting Past Mistakes: Window Borders and Edges

A while ago, I switched from tritium to herbstluftwm. In general, it’s been a good move, benefitting from active development and greater stability, even if I do slightly mourn the move from python scripting to a shell client.

One thing that was annoying me was that throwing the pointer into an edge didn’t find anything clickable. Window borders may be pretty, but they’re a pretty poor choice as the thing that you can locate most easily, the thing that is on the screen edge.

It finally annoyed me enough to find the culprit. The .config/herbstluftwm/autostart file said “hc pad 0 26″ (to keep enough space for the panel at the top edge) and changing that to “hc pad 0 -8 -7 26 -7″ and reconfiguring the panel to be on the bottom (where fewer windows have useful controls) means that throwing the pointer at the top or the sides now usually finds something useful like a scrollbar or a menu.

I wonder if this is a useful enough improvement that I should report it as an enhancement bug.

by mjr at May 14, 2015 04:58 AM

March 09, 2015

Ben Francis

Pinned Apps – An App Model for the Web

(re-posted from a page I created on the Mozilla wiki on 17th December 2014)

Problem Statement

The per-OS app store model has resulted in a market where a small number of OS companies have a large amount of control, limiting choice for users and app developers. In order to get things done on mobile devices users are restricted to using apps from a single app store which have to be downloaded and installed on a compatible device in order to be useful.

Design Concept

Concept Overview

The idea of pinned apps is to turn the apps model on its head by making apps something you discover simply by searching and browsing the web. Web apps do not have to be installed in order to be useful, “pinning” is an optional step where the user can choose to split an app off from the rest of the web to persist it on their device and use it separately from the browser.

Pinned_apps_overview

”If you think of the current app store experience as consumers going to a grocery store to buy packaged goods off a shelf, the web is more like a hunter-gatherer exploring a forest and discovering new tools and supplies along their journey.”

App Discovery

A Web App Manifest linked from a web page says “I am part of a web app you can use separately from the browser”. Users can discover web apps simply by searching or browsing the web, and use them instantly without needing to install them first.

Pinned_apps_discovery

”App discovery could be less like shopping, and more like discovering a new piece of inventory while exploring a new level in a computer game.”

App Pinning

If the user finds a web app useful they can choose to split it off from the rest of the web to persist it on their device and use it separately from the browser. Pinned apps can provide a more app-like experience for that part of the web with no browser chrome and get their own icon on the homescreen.

Pinned_apps_pinning

”For the user pinning apps becomes like collecting pin badges for all their favourite apps, rather than cluttering their device with apps from an app store that they tried once but turned out not to be useful.”

Deep Linking

Once a pinned app is registered as managing its own part of the web (defined by URL scope), any time the user navigates to a URL within that scope, it will open in the app. This allows deep linking to a particular page inside an app and seamlessly linking from one app to another.

Pinned_apps_linking

”The browser is like a catch-all app for pages which don’t belong to a particular pinned app.”

Going Offline

Pinning an app could download its contents to the device to make it work offline, by registering a Service Worker for the app’s URL scope.

Pinned_apps_offline

”Pinned apps take pinned tabs to the next level by actually persisting an app on the device. An app pin is like an anchor point to tether a collection of web pages to a device.”

Multiple Pages

A web app is a collection of web pages dedicated to a particular task. You should be able to have multiple pages of the app open at the same time. Each app could be represented in the task manager as a collection of sheets, pinned together by the app.

Pinned_app_pages

”Exploding apps out into multiple sheets could really differentiate the Firefox OS user experience from all other mobile app platforms which are limited to one window per app.”

Travel Guide

Even in a world without app stores there would still be a need for a curated collection of content. The Marketplace could become less of a grocery store, and more of a crowdsourced travel guide for the web.

Pinned_apps_guide

”If a user discovers an app which isn’t yet included in the guide, they could be given the opportunity to submit it. The guide could be curated by the community with descriptions, ratings and tags.”

3 Questions

Pinnged_apps_pinned

What value (the importance, worth or usefulness of something) does your idea deliver?

The pinned apps concept makes web apps instantly useful by making “installation” optional. It frees users from being tied to a single app store and gives them more choice and control. It makes apps searchable and discoverable like the rest of the web and gives developers the freedom of where to host their apps and how to monetise them. It allows Mozilla to grow a catalogue of apps so large and diverse that no walled garden can compete, by leveraging its user base to discover the apps and its community to curate them.

What technological advantage will your idea deliver and why is this important?

Pinned apps would be implemented with emerging web standards like Web App Manifests and Service Workers which add new layers of functionality to the web to make it a compelling platform for mobile apps. Not just for Firefox OS, but for any user agent which implements the standards.

Why would someone invest time or pay money for this idea?

Users would benefit from a unique new web experience whilst also freeing themselves from vendor lock-in. App developers can reduce their development costs by creating one searchable and discoverable web app for multiple platforms. For Mozilla, pinned apps could leverage the unique properties of the web to differentiate Firefox OS in a way that is difficult for incumbents to follow.

UI Mockups

App Search

Pinned_apps_search

Pin App

Pin_app

Pin Page

Pin_page

Multiple Pages

Multiple_pages

App Directory

App_directory

Implementation

Web App Manifest

A manifest is linked from a web page with a link relation:

  <link rel=”manifest” href=”/manifest.json”>

A manifest can specify an app name, icon, display mode and orientation:

 {
   "name": "GMail"
   "icons": {...},
   "display": "standalone",
   "orientation": “portrait”,
   ...
 }

There is a proposal for a manifest to be able to specify an app scope:

 {
   ...
   "scope": "/"
   ...
 }

Service Worker

There is also a proposal to be able to reference a Service Worker from within the manifest:

 {
   ...
   service_worker: {
     src: "app.js",
     scope: "/"
   ...
 }

A Service Worker has an install method which can populate a cache with a web app’s resources when it is registered:

 this.addEventListener('install', function(event) {
  event.waitUntil(
    caches.create('v1').then(function(cache) {
     return cache.add(
        '/index.html',
        '/style.css',
        '/script.js',
        '/favicon.ico'
      );
    }, function(error) {
        console.error('error populating cache ' + error);
    };
  );
 });

So that the app can then respond to requests for resources when offline:

 this.addEventListener('fetch', function(event) {
  event.respondWith(
    caches.match(event.request).catch(function() {
      return event.default();
    })
  );
 });

by tola at March 09, 2015 03:54 PM

January 30, 2015

Chris Lamb

Calculating the ETA to zero in shell

< Faux> I have a command which emits a number. This number is heading towards zero. I want to know when it will arrive at zero, and how close to zero it has got.

Damn right you can.

eta2zero () {
    A=$(eval ${@})

    while [ ${A} -gt 0 ]
    do
        B=$(eval ${@})
        printf %$((${A} - ${B}))s
        A=${B}
        sleep 1
    done | pv -s ${A} >/dev/null
}

In action:

$ rm -rf /big/path &
[1] 4895
$ eta2zero find /big/path \| wc -l
10 B 0:00:14 [   0 B/s] [================================>    ] 90% ETA 0:00:10

(Sincere apologies for the lack of strace...)

January 30, 2015 08:49 PM

December 11, 2014

Ben Francis

The Times They Are A Changin’ (Open Web Remix)

In the run up to the “Mozlandia” work week in Portland, and in reflection of the last three years of the Firefox OS project, for a bit of fun I’ve reworked a Bob Dylan song to celebrate our incredible journey so far.

Here’s a video featuring some of my memories from the last three years, with Siobhan (my fiancée) and me singing the song at you! There are even lyrics so you can sing along ;)

“Keep on rockin’ the free web” — Potch

by tola at December 11, 2014 11:26 AM

October 09, 2014

Wayne Stallwood (DrJeep)

Hosting Update2

Well after a year the SD card on the Raspberry Pi has failed, I noticed /var was unhappy when I tried to apply the recent Bash updates. Attempts at repair only made things worse and I suspect there is some physical issue. I had minimised writes with logs in tmpfs and the frequently updated weather site sat in tmpfs too..logging to remote systems etc. So not quite sure what happened. Of course this is all very inconvenient when your kit lives in another country, so at some point I guess I will have to build a new SD card and ship it out...for now we are back on Amazon EC2...yay for the elastic cloud \o/

October 09, 2014 09:31 PM

July 10, 2014

James Taylor

SSL / TLS

Is it annoying or not that everyone says SSL Certs and SSL when they really mean TLS?

Does anyone actually mean SSL? Have there been any accidents through people confusing the two?


July 10, 2014 02:09 PM

Cloud Computing Deployments … Revisited.

So its been a few years since I’ve posted, because its been so much hard work, and we’ve been pushing really hard on some projects which I just can’t talk about – annoyingly. Anyways, March 20th , 2011 I talked about Continual Integration and Continual Deployment and the Cloud and discussed two main methods – having what we now call ‘Gold Standards’ vs continually updating.

The interesting thing is that as we’ve grown as a company, and as we’ve become more ‘Enterprise’, we’ve brought in more systems administrators and begun to really separate the deployments from the development. The other thing is we have separated our services out into multiple vertical strands, which have different roles. This means we have slightly different processes for Banking or Payment based modules then we do from marketing modules. We’re able to segregate operational and content from personally identifiable information – PII having much higher regulation on who can (and auditing of who does) access.

Several other key things had to change: for instance, things like SSL keys of the servers shouldn’t be kept in the development repo. Now, of course not, I hear you yell, but its a very blurry line. For instance, should the Django configuration be kept in the repo? Well, yes, because that defines the modules and things like URLs. Should the nginx config be kept in the repo? Well, oh. if you keep *that* in then you would keep your SSL certs in…

So the answer becomes having lots of repo’s. One repo per application (django wise), and one repo per deployment containing configurations. And then you start looking at build tools to bring, for a particular server or cluster of servers up and running.

The process (for our more secure, audited services) is looking like a tool to bring an AMI up, get everything installed and configured, and then take a snapshot, and then a second tool that takes that AMI (and all the others needed) and builds the VPC inside of AWS. Its a step away from the continual deployment strategy, but it is mostly automated.


July 10, 2014 02:09 PM

June 28, 2014

Brett Parker (iDunno)

Sony Entertainment Networks Insanity

So, I have a SEN account (it's part of the PSN), I have 2 videos with SEN, I have a broken PS3 so I can no deactivate video (you can only do that from the console itself, yes, really)... and the response from SEN has been abysmal, specifically:

As we take the security of SEN accounts very seriously, we are unable to provide support on this matter by e-mail as we will need you to answer some security questions before we can investigate this further. We need you to phone us in order to verify your account details because we're not allowed to verify details via e-mail.

I mean, seriously, they're going to verify my details over the phone better than over e-mail how exactly? All the contact details are tied to my e-mail account, I have logged in to their control panel and renamed the broken PS3 to "Broken PS3", I have given them the serial number of the PS3, and yet they insist that I need to call them, because apparently they're fucking stupid. I'm damned glad that I only ever got 2 videos from SEN, both of which I own on DVD now anyways, this kind of idiotic tie in to a system is badly wrong.

So, you phone the number... and now you get stuck with hold music for ever... oh, yeah, great customer service here guys. I mean, seriously, WTF.

OK - 10 minutes on the phone, and still being told "One of our advisors will be with you shortly". I get the feeling that I'll just be writing off the 2 videos that I no longer have access to.

I'm damned glad that I didn't decide to buy more content from that - at least you can reset the games entitlement once every six months without jumping through all these hoops (you have to reactivate each console that you still want to use, but hey).

by Brett Parker (iDunno@sommitrealweird.co.uk) at June 28, 2014 03:54 PM

June 12, 2014

Paul Tansom

Beginning irc

After some discussion last night at PHP Hants about the fact that irc is a great facilitator of support / discussion, but largely ignored because there is rarely enough information for a new user to get going I decided it may be worth putting together a howto type post so here goes…

What is irc?

First of all, what on earth is it? I’m tempted to describe it as Twitter done right years before Twitter even existed, but I’m a geek and I’ve been using irc for years. It has a long heritage, but unlike the ubiquitous email it hasn’t made the transition into mainstream use. In terms of usage it has similarities to things like Twitter and Instant Messaging. Let’s take a quick look at this.

Twitter allows you to broadcast messages, they get published and anyone who is subscribed to your feed can read what you say. Everything is pretty instant, and if somebody is watching the screen at the right time they can respond straight away. Instant Messaging on the other hand, is more of a direct conversation with a single person, or sometimes a group of people, but it too is pretty instantaneous – assuming, of course, that there’s someone reading what you’ve said. Both of these techonologies are pretty familiar to many. If you go to the appropriate website you are given the opportunity to sign up and either use a web based client or download one.

It is much the same for irc in terms of usage, although conversations are grouped into channels which generally focus on a particular topic rather than being generally broadcast (Twitter) or more specifically directed (Instant Messaging). The downside is that in most cases you don’t get a web page with clear instructions of how to sign up, download a client and find where the best place is to join the conversation.

Getting started

There are two things you need to get going with irc, a client and somewhere to connect to. Let’s put that into a more familiar context.

The client is what you use to connect with; this can be an application – so as an example Outlook or Thunderbird would be a mail client, or IE, Firefox, Chrome or Safari are examples of clients for web pages – or it can be a web page that does the same thing – so if you go to twitter.com and login you are using the web page as your Twitter client. Somewhere to connect to can be compared to a web address, or if you’ve got close enough to the configuration of your email to see the details, your mail server address.

Let’s start with the ‘somewhere to connect to‘ bit. Freenode is one of the most popular irc servers, so let’s take a look. First we’ll see what we can find out from their website, http://freenode.net/.

freenode

There’s a lot of very daunting information there for somebody new to irc, so ignore most of it and follow the Webchat link on the left.

webchat

That’s all very well and good, but what do we put in there? I guess the screenshot above gives a clue, but if you actually visit the page the entry boxes will be blank. Well first off there’s the Nickname, this can be pretty much anything you like, no need to register it – stick to the basics of letters, numbers and some simple punctuation (if you want to), keep it short and so long as nobody else is already using it you should be fine; if it doesn’t work try another. Channels is the awkward one, how do you know what channels there are? If you’re lucky you’re looking into this because you’ve been told there’s a channel there and hopefully you’ve been given the channel name. For now let’s just use the PHP Hants channel, so that would be #phph in the Channels box. Now all you need to do is type in the captcha, ignore the tick boxes and click Connect and you are on the irc channel and ready to chat. Down the right you’ll see a list of who else is there, and in the main window there will be a bit of introductory information (e.g. topic for the channel) and depending on how busy it is anything from nothing to a fast scrolling screen of text.

phph

If you’ve miss typed there’s a chance you’ll end up in a channel specially created for you because it didn’t exist; don’t worry, just quit and try again (I’ll explain that process shortly).

For now all you really need to worry about is typing in text an posting it, this is as simple as typing it into the entry box at the bottom of the page and pressing return. Be polite, be patient and you’ll be fine. There are plenty of commands that you can use to do things, but for now the only one you need to worry about is the one to leave, this is:

/quit

Type it in the entry box, press return and you’ve disconnected from the server. The next thing to look into is using a client program since this is far more flexible, but I’ll save that for another post.

by Paul Tansom at June 12, 2014 04:27 PM

May 06, 2014

Richard Lewis

Refocusing Ph.D

Actual progress on this Ph.D revision has been quite slow. My current efforts are on improving the focus of the thesis. One of the criticisms the examiners made (somewhat obliquely) was that it wasn&apost very clear exactly what my subject was: musicology? music information retrieval? computational musicology? And the reason for this was that I failed to make that clear to myself. It was only at the writing up stage, when I was trying to put together a coherent argument, that I decided to try and make it a story about music information retrieval (MIR). I tried to argue that MIR&aposs existing evaluation work (which was largely modelled on information retrieval evaluation from the text world) only took into account the music information needs of recreational users of MIR systems, and that there was very little in the way of studying the music information seeking behaviour of "serious" users. However, the examiners didn&apost even accept that information retrieval was an important problem for musicology, nevermind that there was work to be done in examining music information needs of music scholarship.

So I&aposm using this as an excuse to shift the focus away from MIR a little and towards something more like computational musicology and music informatics. I&aposm putting together a case study of a computational musicology toolkit called music21. Doing this allows me to focus in more detail on a smaller and more distinct community of users (rather than attempting to studying musicologists in general which was another problematic feature of the thesis), it makes it much clearer what kind of music research can be addressed using the technology (all of MIR is either far too diverse or far too generic, depending on how you want to spin it), and also allows me to work with the actually Purcell Plus project materials using the toolkit.

May 06, 2014 11:16 PM

March 27, 2014

Richard Lewis

Taking notes in Haskell

The other day we had a meeting at work with a former colleague (now at QMUL) to discuss general project progress. The topics covered included the somewhat complicated workflow that we&aposre using for doing optical music recognition (OMR) on early printed music sources. It includes mensural notation specific OMR software called Aruspix. Aruspix itself is fairly accurate in its output, but the reason why our workflow is non-trivial is that the sources we&aposre working with are partbooks; that is, each part (or voice) of a multi-part texture is written on its own part of the page, or even on a different page. This is very different to modern score notation in which each part is written in vertical alignment. In these sources, we don&apost even know where separate pieces begin and end, and they can actually begin in the middle of a line. The aim is to go from the double page scans ("openings") to distinct pieces with their complete and correctly aligned parts.

Anyway, our colleague from QMUL was very interested in this little part of the project and suggested that we spend the afternoon, after the style of good software engineering, formalising the workflow. So that&aposs what we did. During the course of the conversation diagrams were drawn on the whiteboard. However (and this was really the point of this post) I made notes in Haskell. It occurred to me a few minutes into the conversation that laying out some types and the operations over those types that comprise our workflow is pretty much exactly the kind of formal specification we needed.

Here&aposs what I typed:

module MusicalDocuments where

import Data.Maybe

-- A document comprises some number of openings (double page spreads)
data Document = Document [Opening]

-- An opening comprises one or two pages (usually two)
data Opening = Opening (Page, Maybe Page)

-- A page comprises multiple systems
data Page = Page [System]

-- Each part is the line for a particular voice
data Voice = Superius | Discantus | Tenor | Contratenor | Bassus

-- A part comprises a list of musical sybmols, but it may span mutliple systems
--(including partial systems)
data Part = Part [MusicalSymbol]

-- A piece comprises some number of sections
data Piece = Piece [Section]

-- A system is a collection of staves
data System = System [Staff]

-- A staff is a list of atomic graphical symbols
data Staff = Staff [Glyph]

-- A section is a collection of parts
data Section = Section [Part]

-- These are the atomic components, MusicalSymbols are semantic and Glyphs are
--syntactic (i.e. just image elements)
data MusicalSymbol = MusicalSymbol
data Glyph = Glyph

-- If this were real, Image would abstract over some kind of binary format
data Image = Image

-- One of the important properties we need in order to be able to construct pieces
-- from the scanned components is to be able to say when objects of the some of the
-- types are strictly contiguous, i.e. this staff immediately follows that staff
class Contiguous a where
  immediatelyFollows :: a -> a -> Bool
  immediatelyPrecedes :: a -> a -> Bool
  immediatelyPrecedes a b = b `immediatelyFollows` a

instance Contiguous Staff where
  immediatelyFollows :: Staff -> Staff -> Bool
  immediatelyFollows = undefined

-- Another interesting property of this data set is that there are a number of
-- duplicate scans of openings, but nothing in the metadata that indicates this,
-- so our workflow needs to recognise duplicates
instance Eq Opening where
  (==) :: Opening -> Opening -> Bool
  (==) a b = undefined

-- Maybe it would also be useful to have equality for staves too?
instance Eq Staff where
  (==) :: Staff -> Staff -> Bool
  (==) a b = undefined

-- The following functions actually represent the workflow

collate :: [Document]
collate = undefined

scan :: Document -> [Image]
scan = undefined

split :: Image -> Opening
split = undefined

paginate :: Opening -> [Page]
paginate = undefined

omr :: Page -> [System]
omr = undefined

segment :: System -> [Staff]
segment = undefined

tokenize :: Staff -> [Glyph]
tokenize = undefined

recogniseMusicalSymbol :: Glyph -> Maybe MusicalSymbol
recogniseMusicalSymbol = undefined

part :: [Glyph] -> Maybe Part
part gs =
  if null symbols then Nothing else Just $ Part symbols
  where symbols = mapMaybe recogniseMusicalSymbol gs

alignable :: Part -> Part -> Bool
alignable = undefined

piece :: [Part] -> Maybe Piece
piece = undefined

I then added the comments and implemented the part function later on. Looking at it now, I keep wondering whether the types of the functions really make sense; especially where a return type is a type that&aposs just a label for a list or pair.

I haven&apost written much Haskell code before, and given that I&aposve only implemented one function here, I still haven&apost written much Haskell code. But it seemed to be a nice way to formalise this procedure. Any criticisms (or function implementations!) welcome.

March 27, 2014 11:13 PM

February 22, 2014

Wayne Stallwood (DrJeep)

Outlook 2003, Cutting off Emails

I had a friend come to me with an interesting problem they were having in their office. Due to the Exchange server and Office licencing they have they are running Outlook 2003 on Windows 7 64bit Machines.

After Internet Explorer updates to IE11 it introduces a rather annoying bug into Outlook. Typed emails often get cut off mid sentence when you click Send ! So only part of the email gets sent !

What I think is happening is that Outlook is reverting to a previously autosaved copy before sending.

Removing the IE11 update would probably fix it but perhaps the easiest way is to disable the "Autosave unsent email" option in Outlook.

Navigate to:-
Tools, Options, E-Mail Options, Advanced E-Mail Options, and disable the "Autosave unsent" option.

February 22, 2014 08:43 AM

February 06, 2014

Adam Bower (quinophex)

I finally managed to beat my nemesis!

I purchased this book http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0738206679 (Linked, by Barabasi) on the 24th of December 2002, I had managed to make 6 or 7 aborted attempts at reading it to completion where life had suddenly got busy and just took over. This meant that I put the book down and didn't pick it up again until things were less hectic some time later and I started again.

Anyhow, I finally beat the book a few nights ago, my comprehension of it was pretty low anyhow but at least it is done. Just shows I need to read lots more given how little went in.




comment count unavailable comments

February 06, 2014 10:40 PM

February 01, 2014

Adam Bower (quinophex)

Why buying a Mio Cyclo 305 HC cycling computer was actually a great idea.

I finally made it back out onto the bike today for the first time since September last year. I'd spent some time ill in October and November which meant I had to stop exercising and as a result I've gained loads of weight over the winter and it turns out also become very unfit which can be verified by looking at the Strava ride from today: http://www.strava.com/activities/110354158

Anyhow, a nice thing about this ride is that I can record it on Strava and get this data about how unfit I have become, this is because last year I bought a Mio Cyclo 305 HC cycle computer http://eu.mio.com/en_gb/mio-cyclo-305-hc.htm from Halfords reduced to £144.50 (using a British Cycling discount). I was originally going to get a Garmin 500 but Amazon put the price up from £149.99 the day I was going to buy it to £199.99.

I knew when I got the Mio that it had a few issues surrounding usability and features but it was cheap enough at under £150 that I figured that even if I didn't get on with it I'd at least have a cadence sensor and heart rate monitor so I could just buy a Garmin 510 when they sorted out the firmware bugs with that and the price came down a bit which is still my longer term intention.

So it turns out a couple of weeks ago I plugged my Mio into a Windows VM when I was testing USB support and carried out a check for new firmware. I was rather surprised to see a new firmware update and new set of map data was available for download. So I installed it think I wasn't going to get any new features from it as Mio had released some new models but it turns out that the new firmware actually enables a single feature (amongst other things, they also tidied up the UI and sorted a few other bugs along with some other features) that makes the device massively more useful as it now also creates files in .fit format which can be uploaded directly to Strava.

This is massively useful for me as although the Mio always worked in Linux as the device is essentially just a USB mass storage device but you would have to do an intermediate step of having to use https://github.com/rhyas/GPXConverter to convert the files from the Mio-centric GPX format to something Strava would recognise. Now I can just browse to the folder and upload the file directly which is very handy.

All in it turns out that buying a Mio which reading reviews and forums were full of doom and gloom means I can wait even longer before considering replacement with a garmin.

comment count unavailable comments

February 01, 2014 02:11 PM

January 04, 2014

Brett Parker (iDunno)

Wow, I do believe Fasthosts have outdone themselves...

So, got a beep this morning from our work monitoring system. One of our customers domain names is hosted with livedns.co.uk (which, as far as I can tell, is part of the Fasthosts franchise)... It appears that Fasthosts have managed to entirely break their DNS:

brettp@laptop:~$ host www.fasthosts.com
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached
brettp@laptop:~$ whois fasthosts.com | grep -i "Name Server"
   Name Server: NS1.FASTHOSTS.NET.UK
   Name Server: NS2.FASTHOSTS.NET.UK
Name Server: NS1.FASTHOSTS.NET.UK
Name Server: NS2.FASTHOSTS.NET.UK
brettp@laptop:~$ whois fasthosts.net.uk | grep -A 2 "Name servers:"
    Name servers:
        ns1.fasthosts.net.uk      213.171.192.252
        ns2.fasthosts.net.uk      213.171.193.248
brettp@laptop:~$  host -t ns fasthosts.net.uk 213.171.192.252
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached
brettp@laptop:~$ host -t ns fasthosts.net.uk 213.171.193.248
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached
brettp@laptop:~$

So, that's fasthosts core nameservers not responding, good start! They also provide livedns.co.uk, so lets have a look at that:

brettp@laptop:~$ whois livedns.co.uk | grep -A 3 "Name servers:"
    Name servers:
        ns1.livedns.co.uk         213.171.192.250
        ns2.livedns.co.uk         213.171.193.250
        ns3.livedns.co.uk         213.171.192.254
brettp@laptop:~$ host -t ns ns1.livedns.co.uk 213.171.192.250
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached
brettp@laptop:~$ host -t ns ns1.livedns.co.uk 213.171.193.250
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached
brettp@laptop:~$ host -t ns ns1.livedns.co.uk 213.171.192.254
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached

So, erm, apparently that's all their DNS servers "Not entirely functioning correctly"! That's quite impressive!

by Brett Parker (iDunno@sommitrealweird.co.uk) at January 04, 2014 10:24 AM

January 01, 2014

John Woodard

A year in Prog!


It's New Year's Day 2014 and I'm reflecting on the music of past year.

Album wise there were several okay...ish releases in the world of Progressive Rock. Steven Wilson's The Raven That Refused To Sing not the absolute masterpiece some have eulogised a solid effort though but it did contain some filler. Motorpsyco entertained with Still Life With Eggplant not as good as their previous album but again a solid effort. Magenta as ever didn't disappoint with The 27 Club, wishing Tina Booth a swift recovery from her ill health.

The Three stand out albums in no particular order for me were Edison's Children's Final Breath Before November which almost made it as album of the year and Big Big Train with English Electric Full Power which combined last years Part One and this years Part Two with some extra goodies to make the whole greater than the sum of the parts. Also Adrian Jones of Nine Stones Close fame pulled one out of the bag with his side Project Jet Black Sea which was very different and a challenging listen, hard going at first but surprisingly very good. This man is one superb guitarist especially if you like emotion wrung out of the instrument like David Gilmore or Steve Rothery.

The moniker of Album of the Year this year goes to Fish for the incredible Feast of Consequences. A real return to form and his best work since Raingods With Zippos. The packaging of the deluxe edition with a splendid book featuring the wonderful artwork of Mark Wilkinson was superb. A real treat with a very thought provoking suite about the first world war really hammed home the saying "Lest we forget". A fine piece that needs to be heard every November 11th.


Gig wise again Fish at the Junction in Cambridge was great. His voice may not be what it was in 1985 but he is the consummate performer, very at home on the stage. As a raconteur between songs he is as every bit as entertaining as he is singing songs themselves.

The March Marillion Convention in Port Zealand, Holland where they performed their masterpiece Brave was very special as every performance of incredible album is. The Marillion Conventions are always special but Brave made this one even more special than it would normally be.
Gig of the year goes again to Marillion at Aylesbury Friars in November. I had waited thirty years and forty odd shows to see them perform Garden Party segued into Market Square Heroes that glorious night it came to pass, I'm am now one very happy Progger or should that be Proggie? Nevermind Viva Progressive Rock!

by BigJohn (aka hexpek) (noreply@blogger.com) at January 01, 2014 07:56 PM

December 01, 2013

Paul Tansom

Scratch in a network environment

I have been running a Code Club at my local Primary School for a while now, and thought it was about time I put details of a few tweaks I’ve made to the default Scratch install to make things easier. So here goes:

With the default install of Scratch (on Windows) projects are saved to the C: drive. For a network environment, with pupils work stored on a network drive so they always have access whichever machine they sit at, this isn’t exactly helpful. It also isn’t ideal that they can explore the C: drive in spite of profile restrictions (although it isn’t the end of the world as there is little they can do from Scratch).

save-orig

After a bit of time with Google I found the answer, and since it didn’t immediately leap out at me when I was searching I thought I’d post it here (perhaps my Google Fu was weak that day). It is actually quite simple, especially for the average Code Club volunteer I should imagine; just edit the scratch.ini file. This is, as would be expected, located in:

C:\Program Files\Scratch\Scratch.ini

Initially it looks like this:

ini-orig

Pretty standard stuff, but unfortunately no comments to indicate what else you can do with it. As it happens you can add the following two lines (for example):

Home=U:
VisibleDrives=U:

To get this:

ini-new

They do exactly what is says on the tin. If you click on the Home button in a file dialogue box then you only get the drive(s) specified. You can also put a full path in if you want to put the home directory further down the directory structure.

save-new1

The VisibleDrives option restricts what you can see if you click on the Computer button in a file dialogue box. If you want to allow more visible drives then separate them with a comma.

save-new2

You can do the same with a Mac (for the home drive), just use the appropriate directory format (i.e. no drive letter and the opposite direction slash).

There is more that you can do, so take a look at the Scratch documentation here. For example if you use a * in the directory path it is replaced by the name of the currently logged on user.

Depending on your network environment it may be handy for your Code Club to put the extra resources on a shared network drive and open up an extra drive in the VisibleDrives. One I haven’t tried yet it is the proxy setting, which I hope will allow me to upload projects to the Scratch website. It goes something like:

ProxyServer=[server name or IP address]
ProxyPort=[port number]

by Paul Tansom at December 01, 2013 07:00 PM

February 22, 2013

Joe Button

Sampler plugin for the baremetal LV2 host

I threw together a simpler sampler plugin for kicks. Like the other plugins it sounds fairly underwhelming. Next challenge will probably be to try plugging in some real LV2 plugins.

February 22, 2013 11:22 PM

February 21, 2013

Joe Button

Baremetal MIDI machine now talks to hardware MIDI devices

The Baremetal MIDI file player was cool, but not quite as cool as a real instrument.

I wired up a MIDI In port along the lines of This one here, messed with the code a bit and voila (and potentially viola), I can play LV2 instrument plugins using a MIDI keyboard:

When I say "LV2 synth plugins", I should clarify that I'm only using the LV2 plugin C API, not the whole .ttl text file shebangle. I hope to get around to that at some point but it will be a while before you can directly plug LV2s into this and expect them to just work.

February 21, 2013 04:05 PM

January 16, 2013

John Woodard

LinuxMint 14 Add Printer Issue


 LinuxMint 14 Add Printer Issue



 

I wanted to print from my LinuxMint 14 (Cinnamon) PC via a shared Windows printer on my network. Problem is it isn’t found by the printers dialog in system settings. I thought I’d done all the normal things to get samba to play nice like rearranging the name resolve order in /etc/samba/smb.conf to a more sane bcast host lmhosts wins. Having host and wins, neither of which I’m using first in the order cocks things up some what. Every time I tried to search for the printer in the system setting dialog it told me “FirewallD is not running. Network printer detection needs services mdns, ipp, ipp-client and samba-client enabled on firewall.” So much scratching of the head there then, because as far as I can tell there ain’t no daemon by that name available!

It turns out thanks to /pseudomorph this has been a bug since LinuxMint12 (based on Ubuntu 11.10). It’s due to that particular daemon (Windows people daemon pretty much = service) being Fedora specific and should have no place in a Debian/Ubuntu based distribution. Bugs of this nature really should be ironed out sooner.

Anyway the simple fix is to use the more traditional approach using the older printer dialog which is accessed by inputting system-config-printer at the command line. Which works just fine so why the new (over a year old) printer config dialog that is inherently broken I ask myself.

The CUPS web interface also works apparently http://localhost:631/ in your favourite browser which should be there as long as CUPS is installed which it is in LinuxMint by default.

So come on Minty people get your bug squashing boots on and stamp on this one please.

Update

Bug #871985 only affects Gnome3 so as long as its not affecting Unity that will be okay Canonical will it!

by BigJohn (aka hexpek) (noreply@blogger.com) at January 16, 2013 12:39 AM

August 20, 2012

David Reynolds

On Music

Lately, (well I say lately, I think it’s been the same for a few years now) I have been finding that it is very rare that an album comes along that affects me in a way that music I heard 10 years ago seem to. That is not to say that I have not heard any music that I like in that time, it just doesn’t seem to mean as music that has been in my life for years. What I am trying to work out is if that is a reflection on the state of music, of how I experience music or just me.

Buying

Buying music was always quite an experience. I would spend weeks, months and sometimes longer saving up to buy some new music. Whether I knew exactly what I wanted or just wanted “something else by this artist” I would spend some time browsing the racks weighing up what was the best value for my money. In the days before the internet, if you wanted to research an artist’s back catalogue, you were generally out of luck unless you had access to books about the artists. This lead to the thrill of finding a hidden gem in the racks that you didn’t know existed or had only heard rumours about. The anticipation of listening to the new music would build even more because I would have to wait until I had travelleled home before I could listen to my new purchases.

Nowadays, with the dizzying amount of music constantly pumped into our ears through the internet, radio, advertising and the plethora of styles and genres, it is difficult to sift through and find artists and music that really speak to you. Luckily, there are websites available to catalogue releases by artists so you are able to do thorough research and even preview your music before you purchase it. Of course the distribution methods have changed massively too. No longer do I have to wait until I can make it to a brick and mortar store to hand over my cash. I can now not only buy physical musical releases on CD or Vinyl online and have it delivered to my door, I can also buy digital music through iTunes, Amazon or Bandcamp or even stream the music straight to my ears through services like Spotify or Rdio. Whilst these online sales avenues are great for artists to be able to sell directly to their fans, I feel that some of the magic has been removed from the purchasing of music for me.

Listening

Listening to the music used to be an even greater event than purchasing it. After having spent the time saving up for the purchase, then the time carefully choosing the music to buy and getting it home, I would then sit myself down and listen to the music. I would immerse myself totally in the music and only listen to it (I might read the liner notes if I hadn’t exhausted them on the way home). It is difficult to imagine doing one thing for 45+ minutes without the constant interruptions from smartphones, tablet computers, games consoles and televisions these days. I can’t rememeber the last time I listened to music on good speakers or headphones (generally I listen on crappy computers speakers or to compressed audio on my iPhone through crappy headphones) without reading Twitter, replying to emails or reading copiuous amounts of information about the artists on Wikipedia. This all serves to distract from the actual enjoyment of just listening to the music.

Experience

The actual act of writing this blog post has called into sharp focus the main reason why music doesn’t seem to affect me nowadays as much as it used to - because I don’t experience it in the same way. My life has changed, I have more resposibilities and less time to just listen which makes the convenience and speed of buying digital music online much more appealing. You would think that this ‘instant music’ should be instantly satisfying but for some reason it doesn’t seem to work that way.

What changed?

I wonder if I am the only one experiencing this? My tastes in music have definitely changed a lot over the last few years, but I still find it hard to find music that I want to listen to again and again. I’m hoping I’m not alone in this, alternatively I’m hoping someone might read this and recommend some awesome music to me and cure this weird musical apathy I appear to me suffering from.

August 20, 2012 03:33 PM

On Music

Lately, (well I say lately, I think it’s been the same for a few years now) I have been finding that it is very rare that an album comes along that affects me in a way that music I heard 10 years ago seem to. That is not to say that I have not heard any music that I like in that time, it just doesn’t seem to mean as music that has been in my life for years. What I am trying to work out is if that is a reflection on the state of music, of how I experience music or just me.

Buying

Buying music was always quite an experience. I would spend weeks, months and sometimes longer saving up to buy some new music. Whether I knew exactly what I wanted or just wanted “something else by this artist” I would spend some time browsing the racks weighing up what was the best value for my money. In the days before the internet, if you wanted to research an artist’s back catalogue, you were generally out of luck unless you had access to books about the artists. This lead to the thrill of finding a hidden gem in the racks that you didn’t know existed or had only heard rumours about. The anticipation of listening to the new music would build even more because I would have to wait until I had travelleled home before I could listen to my new purchases.

Nowadays, with the dizzying amount of music constantly pumped into our ears through the internet, radio, advertising and the plethora of styles and genres, it is difficult to sift through and find artists and music that really speak to you. Luckily, there are websites available to catalogue releases by artists so you are able to do thorough research and even preview your music before you purchase it. Of course the distribution methods have changed massively too. No longer do I have to wait until I can make it to a brick and mortar store to hand over my cash. I can now not only buy physical musical releases on CD or Vinyl online and have it delivered to my door, I can also buy digital music through iTunes, Amazon or Bandcamp or even stream the music straight to my ears through services like Spotify or Rdio. Whilst these online sales avenues are great for artists to be able to sell directly to their fans, I feel that some of the magic has been removed from the purchasing of music for me.

Listening

Listening to the music used to be an even greater event than purchasing it. After having spent the time saving up for the purchase, then the time carefully choosing the music to buy and getting it home, I would then sit myself down and listen to the music. I would immerse myself totally in the music and only listen to it (I might read the liner notes if I hadn’t exhausted them on the way home). It is difficult to imagine doing one thing for 45+ minutes without the constant interruptions from smartphones, tablet computers, games consoles and televisions these days. I can’t rememeber the last time I listened to music on good speakers or headphones (generally I listen on crappy computers speakers or to compressed audio on my iPhone through crappy headphones) without reading Twitter, replying to emails or reading copiuous amounts of information about the artists on Wikipedia. This all serves to distract from the actual enjoyment of just listening to the music.

Experience

The actual act of writing this blog post has called into sharp focus the main reason why music doesn’t seem to affect me nowadays as much as it used to - because I don’t experience it in the same way. My life has changed, I have more resposibilities and less time to just listen which makes the convenience and speed of buying digital music online much more appealing. You would think that this ‘instant music’ should be instantly satisfying but for some reason it doesn’t seem to work that way.

What changed?

I wonder if I am the only one experiencing this? My tastes in music have definitely changed a lot over the last few years, but I still find it hard to find music that I want to listen to again and again. I’m hoping I’m not alone in this, alternatively I’m hoping someone might read this and recommend some awesome music to me and cure this weird musical apathy I appear to me suffering from.

August 20, 2012 03:33 PM

June 25, 2012

Elisabeth Fosbrooke-Brown (sfr)

Black redstarts

It's difficult to use the terrace for a couple of weeks, because the black redstart family is in their summer residence at the top of a column under the roof. The chicks grow very fast, and the parents have to feed them frequently; when anyone goes out on the terrace they stop the feeding process and click shrill warnings to the chicks to stay still. I worry that if we disturb them too often or for too long the chicks will starve.

Black redstarts are called rougequeue noir (black red-tail) in French, but here they are known as rossignol des murailles (nightingale of the outside walls). Pretty!

The camera needs replacing, so there are no photos of Musatelier's rossignols des murailles, but you can see what they look like on http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rougequeue_noir.

by sunflowerinrain (noreply@blogger.com) at June 25, 2012 08:02 AM

June 16, 2012

Elisabeth Fosbrooke-Brown (sfr)

Roundabout at Mirambeau

Roundabouts are taken seriously here in France. Not so much as traffic measures (though it has been known for people to be cautioned by the local gendarmes for not signalling when leaving a roundabout, and quite rightly too), but as places to ornament.

A couple of years ago the roundabout at the edge of  Mirambeau had a make-over which included an ironwork arch and a carrelet (fishing hut on stilts). Now it has a miniature vineyard as well, and roses and other plants for which this area is known.

Need a passenger to take photo!

by sunflowerinrain (noreply@blogger.com) at June 16, 2012 12:06 PM

September 04, 2006

Ashley Howes

Some new photos

Take a look at some new photos my father and I have taken. We are experimenting with our new digital SLR with a variety of lenses.

by Ashley (noreply@blogger.com) at September 04, 2006 10:42 AM

August 30, 2006

Ashley Howes

A Collection of Comments

This is a bit of fun. A collection of comments found in code. This is from The Daily WTF.

by Ashley (noreply@blogger.com) at August 30, 2006 01:13 AM